HIV Longevity Still Fighting…

5Mar/09Off

Fitness

There is a fad that is sweeping across America (and the world for that matter). It is categorized as healthier living. With more than 30% of Americans being classified as obese, it is time for this fad to kick into action!

Gratuitous Disclaimer: I am afraid that before I talk about this fantastic subject, I must first warn you of the inherent danger associated with it… Working out and exercise can be dangerous. You can be seriously injured, crippled or killed. The opinions, stories and ideas presented here are my own and do not constitute a recommendation of or endorsement for any particular or general use. You should seek a professional medical evaluation before starting an exercise program. If you choose to workout, you do so at your own risk.

With that painful dissertation out of the way...

Exercise is an essential part of life. Without it, our immune system falters, our muscles atrophy and fat reigns in our bodies. On top of all that hype, I am in really good shape. As I type this Blog entry, my weight is 191 pounds and I have ~10% body fat. I am stronger than I’ve ever been in my life and I am 42 years old. Don’t let my young age scare you away… There are people in their 70’s who are still weight lifting and having excellent results and gains! Join the mayhem!
me

There are literally hundreds of reasons to exercise... My top picks are these:

  • Functional Strength - I want to be able to help my friends move into their new house without suffering through three+ days of pain. I also want to be able to jump on my mountain bike on a whim and hang with others without agony and pain afterward.
  • Core Strength - I want my lower back and abdomen to be top-notched. I avoid injury in this area at all costs. It is important to me to maintain a very strong and healthy core, which is where most of your strength originates.
  • Joint Strength - My knees, hips, ankles, shoulders and elbows used to ache me. Much of this pain stems from bleeds in these joints when I was younger. I fear that the blood has helped to deteriorate my cartilage, etc. Regular exercise has helped to stabilize each of these areas, and I no longer have any joint pain whatsoever.
  • Muscular Body - It is important to me to look good. I do not consider myself vain, but I do take pride in the body that I have created through tons of hard work. I feel better about myself and more confident when I stand strong and muscular. This conveys in all aspects of my life.
  • Healthy Body - This one doesn’t really need any explanation. My immune system is already in a fight for its life (literally), so every little bit that I can do to turn the tide of that battle I will do. Exercise can lower your cholesterol levels, prevent heart disease and even stop diabetes and cancer for starters…
  • Those are just some of my reasons for staying in shape, but you get the point… Now, I want to address some of the more popular ways to achieve this so called strength and physical fitness level.

    Anaerobic
    In it’s simplest description, anaerobic training is bursts of high activity that trigger anaerobic metabolism and result in lactic acid creation. One of the most famous forms of anaerobic exercise is weight lifting. Athletes and fitness buffs use anaerobic exercise to strengthen and/or increase muscle. Basically, you work yourself until ample lactic acid builds up in your targeted muscle group and they fail.

    For strength training, most people will try to do between four and eight repetitions of exercise in each set. By doing eight or fewer repetitions, you are primarily targeting the fast twitch (power) muscles. It is essential that you bring the muscle group to complete failure (sometime beyond failure with advanced techniques like negatives, stripping, etc.)

    For mass training (think bodybuilding), most weight lifters will shoot for muscular failure between eight and twelve reps. This allows the fast and slow twitch muscles to be a part of the exercise and gives the most overall growth potential.

    Endurance training (and/or trimming) usually entails doing more than 12 repetitions, as this will primarily use slow twitch (or endurance) muscles. And, fat is burned as you keep your heart rate high for an extended period of time.

    Aerobic
    The jury is still out on what type of aerobic activity is better than another. I use aerobic exercise like running to burn fat. I shoot for three days per week (with rest days between each session). During each daily activity, I try to workout for 45 minutes and get my heart rate into a target area of 75-90% of my maximum predicted heart rate (MPHR = 220-your age). I should mention that I do not believe in this formula, because I am 42 years old and have had my heart rate up to 192! Your true MHR can be determined by a physician using a standard Stress Test.

    Walking
    Except to get from point A to point B, I don’t walk much. I find it boring and it takes forever to get what I want from it. Instead, I will run or use the elliptical. I should mention that I do walk before and after my runs as a warm-up and cool down.

    I know that many people swear by walking, so I didn’t want to leave it out… However, it ain’t my cup of tea. To reiterate, I do walk a good distance each day, but not for exercise, I use it to get from point A to point B.

    Swimming
    I swim a couple of times per year. If I had a heated pool (or indoor) I’m sure I would do this on a regular basis. I think that swimming may be the best way to get a serious aerobic workout. If you do this, good on you!

    Stretching
    Stretching is great to help relieve muscle aches after workouts and runs. It’s also keeps you flexible, renews energy and helps to avoid injuries. For this reason, I believe that stretching should be a part of everyone’s workout plan. I stretch on my aerobic days. I stretch large muscle groups by slowly (never go fast, bounce or jerk) moving into the stretch and holding it for 22 seconds. Near the end of my 22 seconds, I strive to stretch just a little bit deeper. Also, I only stretch after my workouts, as I have found that cold muscles do not stretch nearly as well and you might even invite injury or pain while stretching cold.

    HIT and HIV!
    Have you heard of HIT (high intensity training)? It is incredible! Essentially, it consists of lifting weights two (or fewer) days per week. Each workout is a full body workout and it only takes 27 minutes to complete.

    I know what you’re thinking, How can you get a full body workout in fewer than 60 minutes per week? I’m here to tell you that it works. I have been doing HIT for more than a year now and I have made steady strength and mass gains since starting. For the first time in my life, I am relatively injury and pain free. If you wanna give HIT a try, start by checking out Dr. Ellington Darden’s HIT forum:
    http://www.drdarden.com

    Also, I would suggest picking up his book: The New High Intensity Training.

    That’s it for exercise… If you would like to learn more, simply drop by my forum and checkout the Fitness board here:
    http://www.vaughnripley.com/forum/index.php?board=14.0

    Cheers,
    Rip

    WARNING (in case you missed the first one): Working out and exercise can be dangerous. You can be seriously injured, crippled or killed. The opinions, stories and ideas presented here are my own and do not constitute a recommendation of or endorsement for any particular or general use. You should seek a professional medical evaluation before starting an exercise program. If you choose to workout, you do so at your own risk.

    p.s. This post is a chapter in my blog-book, The Secret to Longevity. Checkout my similar posts here: http://hivlongevity.com/the-secret. Or, follow the goodie trail:
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    Posted by Vaughn Ripley

    Comments (2) Trackbacks (1)
    1. V – Great points about exercise, but I think you missed one key benefit: It improves mood. And as we all know, being in a good mood builds into a happy life and a positive outlook.

    2. Not sure how I overlooked that, but you are absolutely correct!